Bookstock 2014: Supporting Reading in Metro Detroit Through Book and Media Recycling


I was selected for this sponsored post by Hay There Social Media. All opinions expressed here are my own.

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Books. Books. Books.

As a high school science teacher, and the 2014 Michigan Teacher of the Year, it seems like a fair assumption that I would be into reading. That assumption would be correct, but I loved reading well before I became a classroom teacher.

I have been an avid reader since I was in elementary school and first learned to read. As I grew up, I struggled with my vision and had to rely heavily on audiobooks, but I still read a lot. To this day, I read regularly and almost always have an audiobook playing during my travels around the state of Michigan. If you want some suggested titles, you can even check out some of the books that most influenced my career.

As a new dad, I am learning about the importance of childhood reading, the 30 Million Word Gap, and projects, like the Thirty Million Words initiative, to help give kids a head start in their education through reading. That’s why when I was asked to help spread the word about a great Metro Detroit event, like Bookstock, which supports and advocates for reading, it was something in which I immediately wanted to be involved and help promote. Kids and adults of all ages can participate in Bookstock by donating used books/media or attending to make a supporting purchase.

You’re probably wondering about some of the details, so allow me to tell you a little more about Bookstock.

bookstockWHAT IS BOOKSTOCK?

Bookstock is an annual, non-profit used book and media sale event. It is a highly visible week-long event with thousands of shoppers. Bookstock has over 100,000 donated used books, DVDs, CDs, books on tape, magazines and records for sale, at bargain basement prices.All merchandise sold comes from donations and all workers and organizers are volunteers. Proceeds from the sale are donated to non-profit organizations that support literacy and reading projects in Metro Detroit. Merchandise remaining after the sale is donated to area non-profit organizations and schools to further support the mission of Bookstock.

WHEN AND WHERE IS BOOKSTOCK?

  • Bookstock 2014 takes place April 27 – May 4 at Laurel Park Place in Livonia, Michigan
  • Hours are 10:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m. Monday through Saturday and 11:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. on both Sundays
  • On Sunday, April 27th, from 8:15 a.m.-11:00 a.m., there is a Pre-Sale for which there is a $20 entrance fee.
  • Other than the Pre-Sale event, admission to Bookstock is free.

HOW DID BOOKSTOCK COME TO BE?

Bookstock is a project of the Detroit Jewish Community Relations Council (JCRC). Because more than 600 volunteers are needed annually, a coalition of twelve organizations, including JCRC, work together to produce Bookstock. Each member organization of the Bookstock coalition maintains its own 501(c)(3) non-profit status and supports literacy and education in Detroit and the metropolitan area. Bookstock is a reincarnation of the Brandeis University National Women’s Committee, Detroit Chapter, Used Book Sales that were held in Detroit and Southfield annually over a forty-year period.

WHO BENEFITS FROM BOOKSTOCK?

Bookstock benefits the entire community by recycling gently used books and media and then offering them for sale at value prices. Most books and media range in price from $1-$4, although there are “special selections” (more valuable books) at various price points.

In 12 years, Bookstock has donated just shy of $1,000,000 to non-profit organizations in Detroit and the metro area, including those comprising its coalition. Additionally, Bookstock donates large quantities of unsold books to other non-profit organizations and schools. For example, the Salvation Army receives the bulk of the remaining books and media. Bookstock also underwrites a scholarship at the Wayne State University School of Library Science and supports the Bookstock Fund, a literacy fund that provides micro-grants to enhance literacy and learning in Detroit and the metro area.

WHAT DOES THE BOOKSTOCK EVENT WEEK INVOLVE?  

  1. Bookstock’s Monday Madness, Monday, April 28, all day: Each purchaser receives an envelope with varying prizes. Prizes are randomly varied in each envelope but a single envelope could include gift cards, coupons and/or a giveaway.
  2. Teacher Appreciation Night, Tuesday, April 29, 3:00 a.m. – 9:00 p.m.: 50% discount for teachers with valid school ID.
  3. Bookstock B.E.S.T. Award, Tuesday, April 29, 5:00 p.m.:  The B.E.S.T. Award is given to the winners of a contest open to fourth grade students in the Detroit Public Schools based on submission of a one page essay about their favorite books. Five students, their teachers, and their schools all receive monetary awards.
  4. Booksbuster Sale, Wednesday, April 30 and Thursday, May 1, 3:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.: For every three items purchased, a fourth one may be gotten for free (it must be the least expensive of the four chosen).
  5. Half-Price Sale, Sunday, May 4, all day: All books and media are half price.

FIND BOOKSTOCK ON SOCIAL MEDIA

Image Credits: Gary G. Abud, Jr. | Bookstock.info 

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Gary is an influential teacher leader with extensive experience educating students at the high school and university level. He is a regular conference presenter, education speaker, and leader of staff development for educators. His classroom practice embraces a collaborative environment centered on constructivist teaching, project-based learning, classroom branding, Modeling Instruction, standards-based grading, and mobile device technologies.

About Gary G Abud Jr

Gary is an influential teacher leader with extensive experience educating students at the high school and university level. He is a regular conference presenter, education speaker, and leader of staff development for educators. His classroom practice embraces a collaborative environment centered on constructivist teaching, project-based learning, classroom branding, Modeling Instruction, standards-based grading, and mobile device technologies.

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