Teacher Leadership Challenge | May 5, 2014 #TeacherHero


Screen Shot 2013-08-31 at 5.01.03 PMThis multipart series is intended to help teachers grow their leadership practice and ignite conversations about education online, through blogging, and in person.

The goal of a teacher leader is to improve the learning of all students through their efforts, collaboration, and influence. The 2014 Teacher Leadership Challenge is a weekly installment activity that poses a prompt on an educational topic or issue. Your challenge is to respond to the prompt in 500 words or less via a post you publish to your blog. The aim is to get more teachers thinking globally about their classroom practice and their own connection to the wider education community. You can subscribe to this blog to get the weekly challenge sent automatically by email.

You could share your post to Twitter using #TLC2014 and spark conversation with educators. In addition to posting on your own blog, you can elect to include your post in the weekly collection showcase blog. To do this, simply email your completed response post to the showcase, at tlc2014.posts@blogger.com Make sure that you include the title of your post with the week of the prompt for proper tagging (e.g., “My Post Title | September 6, 2013″) in the subject line (without “re:”) of your email, and the full post laid out in paragraphs in the body of the email. Posts are automatically published by sending the email. You can embed images and URLs into the body of your email, and the post will publish while maintaining your formatting and layout. Check out others’ responses in the response collection or on Google+ each week, leave them your comments, and get the conversation rolling ahead for teacher leadership.

 

This Week’s Challenge:

How are teachers heroes who make a difference in the lives of kids?

IMG_2687Last week, the 2014 National Teacher of the Year, Sean McComb, was announced at the White House in Washington, D.C. In his address to the nation’s teachers, and in his first press conference at the White House, Sean called not only for great teachers and teacher leaders in education, but suggested the need for “teacher heroes.”

Sharing his own story of how a high school English teacher made all the difference in his own school career, Sean explained how that teacher hero has inspired him to “pay it forward” to other kids in his own teaching. Just as all of us teachers across the nation commit to making a difference for our students, this week being Teacher Appreciation Week reminds us that we should encourage ourselves and others to think about and acknowledge the teacher heroes in our lives.

The National and State Teacher of the Year Programs around the nation recognize classroom teachers who represent the best in education. That is not to say one teacher is better than another, but the Teacher of the Year (or TOY) is a teacher who embodies all the greatness of education around their state. They are not recognized instead of other teachers, but they are recognized for other teachers. The State Teachers of the Year carry the torch of education in their state and represent the best of teachers around them. No State Teacher of the Year achieves that accomplishment alone; rather they do it because of the other great teachers around them and those who they have had in their own careers as students themselves.

We have all had teachers who inspire us and push us to be our best. Whether you spent time working with a single teacher or coach, or learned from all the teachers in your life, you can probably recall one heroic influence that a teacher had on you. As an educator, you might even have your own personal story of when you made that critical impact on a student of your own. Either way, this week’s challenge asks you to share your story of that #TeacherHero. Share your story on your social media channels using #TeacherHero during May 5 – 9, 2014 for Teacher Appreciation Week, or maybe let that #TeacherHero know your story directly with an email or hand-written note.

 

Image Credit: Gary G. Abud, Jr.

 

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Gary is an influential teacher leader with extensive experience educating students at the high school and university level. He is a regular conference presenter, education speaker, and leader of staff development for educators. His classroom practice embraces a collaborative environment centered on constructivist teaching, project-based learning, classroom branding, Modeling Instruction, standards-based grading, and mobile device technologies.

About Gary G Abud Jr

Gary is an influential teacher leader with extensive experience educating students at the high school and university level. He is a regular conference presenter, education speaker, and leader of staff development for educators. His classroom practice embraces a collaborative environment centered on constructivist teaching, project-based learning, classroom branding, Modeling Instruction, standards-based grading, and mobile device technologies.

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